Here are all of the posts tagged ‘Instagram’.

We Are Social Asia Tuesday Tune-Up #193

by Nurfarah Mattar in News

Almost Confirmed: Consumerism Found on Mars
Following NASA’s announcement, a flurry of content has been released by brands. The folks at 20th Century Fox were particularly reeling with jokes, premised on their upcoming film, The Martian (For the Curious Cats: Did NASA time its Mars announcement to coincide with ‘The Martian’?). Also spotted was Matt Damon, toasting to a liquid diet. The Facebook video received close to 40K views within hours.

Also chiming in was Lego, Papa John’s, Intel and the Internet in general.

Back in Asia, mentions of the discovery exploded on Twitter.

There there, Liverpool fans.

Spotify Hongkong Launches First Gig Series in Style
With over 20 million subscribers, Spotify is a household name in the online streaming industry. Now the company has taken music offline, in a suspicious move toward world domination.

Found the Sound is the brainchild of Spotify and Fashion Walk – delivering live music for shoppers at Causeway Bay, Hongkong. Sunita Kar, Managing Director of Spotify Asia, explained how ‘music and lifestyle go hand in hand’. The event series allows engagement with Hongkong shoppers, as well as the delivery of experiences beyond a digital platform.

With an emphasis on lifestyle and experiences, Spotify has taken a page out of social thinking. It is people who make brands social, not platforms.

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We Are Social Asia Tuesday Tune-Up #191

by Tobias Cragg in News

South East Asian haze floods social media
As smoky air drifts across the region, users from Singapore, Indonesia, and Malaysia have vented their frustration on Facebook and Twitter. In Singapore, many closely follow the government’s air monitoring index, the PSI, to note the safety of outdoor activity and whether or not it’s time to don the ubiquitous safety mask. Some Twitter users such as radio personality Joakim Gomez have attempted to find a particulate of humour in the cloud of frustration.

In Indonesia, the hashtag #masihmelawanasap, translated as ‘Still fighting the haze’, expresses a sentiment that effective strategies and solutions to combatting future outbreaks of the heavy smog have yet to be outlined.


While the debate between those who actually burn the forests and those companies who facilitate the burn are as consistent as the haze itself, a campaign by the World Wildlife Fund, incorporating both online and out-of-home efforts is reminding Singaporean consumers that ‘We Breathe What We Buy’.  A beautiful, if haunting, re-imagination of everyday items as burning forests, hits the point home.


Some were able to find the lighter side of the pollution and used their digital imagery skills to Photoshop monsters into Singapore’s hazy skyline.


Instagram rolls out highly anticipated full-funnel ad solution
Instagram, the US’ second largest ad platform behind Facebook, is enabling advertisers to launch ads, implementing Facebook’s ad management technology. Instagram has 300 million active users worldwide, and the advertising capabilities will be available in more than 30 countries. These countries include Hong Kong, Indonesia, India and New Zealand, where brands such as (@intel_indonesia) and Air New Zealand (@airnz) will be the first to test these ads out.

The platform has also introduced ‘Marquee’, which allows advertisers to up their real-time Instagram offering by ‘owning a moment’ – good news for those launching products or involved in live events.

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We Are Social Asia Midweek Mashup #189

by Wendy Yee in News

DeNA launches mobile gaming live-streaming app
Japanese mobile gaming giant, DeNA, launches new app for Android devices, Mirrativ, in the hopes of creating a similarly rabid fanbase as seen for online live video games – cue PewDiePie on YouTube – but this time, for mobile games. Mirrativ allows users to stream their entire device screen to viewers (similar to Periscope or Meerkat), watch live streams, and interact with gamers in real-time. Viewers can post comments and ‘likes’ on streams as they watch, and can also follow users. The free Android app supports English, Japanese, and Korean. DeNA didn’t specify a timeline for Mirrativ’s iOS launch, only that it’s coming soon.


Line halts plan for IPO
For the second year in a row, smartphone messaging app, Line, is putting off plans for IPO. In an interview with the Wall Street Journal, the company will be delaying the offering until “at least next spring.” A Line spokeswoman told the WSJ that the company did not have a definite timeline for the IPO.

“Regarding future prospects, we will make a decision based on market conditions and the evolution of our business performance,” she added. The app faces slow growth, with other popular messaging apps all combining to slow Line’s expansion. Line has also failed to take off in China – due to the Great Firewall – and in India, where people seem to prefer to juggle Facebook and WhatsApp. Read the rest of this entry »

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1 Billion Insights: What People #Love

by Simon Kemp in News

Screen Shot 2015-08-21 at 3.28.48 PM

Every day, somewhere between 300,000 and half a million photos are uploaded to Instagram with the hashtag #love.

A few moments ago, those photos passed a particularly special milestone as the one-billionth photo tagged with #love was added to the photo sharing network.

Based on a wholly human (i.e. subjective) analysis of many thousands of posts tagged with #love over the past 12 months, the most common themes amongst Instagram posts tagged with #love are (in no particular order):

  • Selfies
  • Friendships & Couples
  • Requests for Followers
  • Illustrated Quotes
  • Pets & Animals
  • Fashion & Accessories
  • Beauty (Make-Up & Nail Art)
  • Food, Cafés & Restaurants
  • Travel Photos
  • Celebrities

The themes alone don’t explain the full picture, though; for that, we need to dig a little deeper, and interpret what we see.

#Love, Love Me Do

The most startling finding was the one that was  most obvious when we started exploring the hashtag stream.

The majority of photos tagged with #love seem to be people searching for ‘love’ – or at least people hoping to attract other people’s attention, admiration, recognition, or lust.

Our interpretation of this behaviour is that people don’t go to Instagram (or social media more generally, for that matter) to discover new products; they go there in the hope of being discovered themselves.

Because of this, most people are behaving in the same way that brands behave in social media: they’re posting content about themselves – notably selfies – in hope that other people will ‘like’ them (and comment, and share, and follow…).

What we found most interesting is that many of these #love posts appear to be attempts to deal with individual insecurities. They appear to address needs that sit squarely in the middle of Maslow’s hierarchy (Esteem Needs and Love & Belonging Needs):


The key observation: people are using the #love hashtag to address their need for personal affirmation.

When you think about that, it’s not really very surprising; everybody wants to be loved.

However, we were surprised by the way that this need has translated into the use of a hashtag that we’d expected to be more about the expression of a present emotion (e.g. “I love…”) than the desire to fulfil an absent emotion (e.g. “I want to be loved”).

There are, of course, numerous examples of things people do ‘love’ – their partners, their friends and families, pets and animals, and celebrities – but the overwhelming majority of posts seem to fall into the category of fulfilling absent emotion than expressing present emotion.

The Naked Truth

What’s more, many people using the #love hashtag seem willing to go to extreme lengths to attract other people’s attention.

Roughly 3-5% of all posts tagged with #love are selfies involving nudity – male and female. If you want to verify this for yourself, do note that some of the pictures are particularly sexually explicit. They’re not for the faint-hearted, and they’re definitely NSFW.

Shock-value aside, it’s worth making an important distinction here between ‘nude selfies’ – which appear to be individuals’ attempts to get other people’s attention – and outright porn, which usually includes links to third-party websites. Our analysis suggests that individuals posting selfies in various states of undress outweigh ‘porn’ by a significant margin.

As a platform, Instgram doesn’t permit images containing nudity, but as you might expect given this volume of uploads, it can take some time before offending pictures are removed.

Tell Me I’m Beautiful…

People often use the #love hashtag together with photographs of make-up and nail-art too. What’s most interesting about these photos is that there are considerably fewer mentions of brands than I’d expect.

There appear to be two key motivations behind beauty-oriented posts. The first is closed related to the theme we saw above, where people are looking for the affirmation of other through their activities – the posts almost seem to ask ‘what do you think of me in this make-up’, without necessarily asking the question directly.

The second motivation is more marketing-related, but it’s generally about selling a make-up or nail artist, rather than the products they sell. This may be determined as much by the sheer volume of posts shared by individuals versus brands, of course, but the findings are nonetheless interesting and valuable to marketers hoping to understand their audiences.

…Tell Me I’ve Got Style

One of the most frequent hashtag correlations we identified was between #love and #ootd (i.e. outfit of the day). Fashion more generally seems to overlap neatly with the #love hashtag, but as with the Beauty theme above it appears that the person posting the photo is more interested in demonstrating their own sense of style than necessarily calling out specific brands.

On a related note, it’s worth highlighting a significant number of posts of people in revealing outfits or underwear. There’s a fine line here that merits some further exploration though, namely the balance between the opportunity for self-expression and the potential for people to make decisions they’ll later regret, or even the risk of exploitation.

(Don’t You) Wish You Were Here?

Even when it comes to product- and brand-related posts, there’s still a tendency to use the #love hashtag to call out things that the ‘poster’ expects other people to love, as much as what they themselves love.

For example, when it comes to travel, there’s a strong tendency towards envy-inducing shots: beaches at sunset, amazing hotel rooms, spectacular landscapes.

The same is true of most photos tagged with #food: there’s a tendency to post impressive meals that the individuals have prepared themselves (the desire for acknowledgment), or that they’re enjoying in special locations or restaurants (a trigger for envy).

Whilst these posts are perhaps less narcissistic than selfies, they still seem to demonstrate that constant need for the recognition and envy of others.

So What?

So what can marketers do with this information?

The answer lies in understanding the motivations that drive this behaviour, not simply in being able to track the behaviour itself.

That many people have a constant need for a self-esteem boost shouldn’t come as a shock to any of us, but it’s interesting how so few brands are fulfilling that need. Indeed, with their own constant attempts to get noticed and attract ‘likes’, most brands in social media are demonstrating the same insecurities themselves.

The big opportunity for brands in all of this is to understand how they can provide what these people need.

Brands could interpret that in two ways, though. One route would be to adopt the Dove approach, addressing the insecurities that drive the behavior in the first place.

The alternative would be to offer the recognition and affirmation the people using the hashtag seem to crave.

Either way, with half a million new #love posts a day, there’s plenty more left for marketers to learn from this incredibly popular hashtag.

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We Are Social Asia Tuesday Tuneup #187

by Aubrey Teng in News

WeChat valued at $83.6 billion
WeChat, China’s messaging app giant, is valued at $83.6 billion. That makes up almost half of parent company TenCent’s value. On top of messaging, it also serves as a platform for ecommerce, mobile payments, social gaming, media and more with a user base of 600 million. With such impressive statistics, it is not hard to see why WeChat and other similar messaging chat apps are attracting many investors.

MSTY, a new music messaging app, launches globally
A new music messaging app MSTY (My Song to You) has recently launched worldwide. It gives users a new way to communicate with friends by combining music with text and photos. Users can pick a song from MSTY’s curated song-clips. They can then attach a photo by taking one in the app, importing a picture from their camera roll or using one of the template images from the app’s library. Users can also type a short message on the image.

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