Here are all of the posts tagged ‘Instagram’.

1 Billion Insights: What People #Love

by Simon Kemp in News

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Every day, somewhere between 300,000 and half a million photos are uploaded to Instagram with the hashtag #love.

A few moments ago, those photos passed a particularly special milestone as the one-billionth photo tagged with #love was added to the photo sharing network.

Based on a wholly human (i.e. subjective) analysis of many thousands of posts tagged with #love over the past 12 months, the most common themes amongst Instagram posts tagged with #love are (in no particular order):

  • Selfies
  • Friendships & Couples
  • Requests for Followers
  • Illustrated Quotes
  • Pets & Animals
  • Fashion & Accessories
  • Beauty (Make-Up & Nail Art)
  • Food, Cafés & Restaurants
  • Travel Photos
  • Celebrities

The themes alone don’t explain the full picture, though; for that, we need to dig a little deeper, and interpret what we see.

#Love, Love Me Do

The most startling finding was the one that was  most obvious when we started exploring the hashtag stream.

The majority of photos tagged with #love seem to be people searching for ‘love’ – or at least people hoping to attract other people’s attention, admiration, recognition, or lust.

Our interpretation of this behaviour is that people don’t go to Instagram (or social media more generally, for that matter) to discover new products; they go there in the hope of being discovered themselves.

Because of this, most people are behaving in the same way that brands behave in social media: they’re posting content about themselves – notably selfies – in hope that other people will ‘like’ them (and comment, and share, and follow…).

What we found most interesting is that many of these #love posts appear to be attempts to deal with individual insecurities. They appear to address needs that sit squarely in the middle of Maslow’s hierarchy (Esteem Needs and Love & Belonging Needs):

MASLOW'S HIERARCHY OF NEEDS

The key observation: people are using the #love hashtag to address their need for personal affirmation.

When you think about that, it’s not really very surprising; everybody wants to be loved.

However, we were surprised by the way that this need has translated into the use of a hashtag that we’d expected to be more about the expression of a present emotion (e.g. “I love…”) than the desire to fulfil an absent emotion (e.g. “I want to be loved”).

There are, of course, numerous examples of things people do ‘love’ – their partners, their friends and families, pets and animals, and celebrities – but the overwhelming majority of posts seem to fall into the category of fulfilling absent emotion than expressing present emotion.

The Naked Truth

What’s more, many people using the #love hashtag seem willing to go to extreme lengths to attract other people’s attention.

Roughly 3-5% of all posts tagged with #love are selfies involving nudity – male and female. If you want to verify this for yourself, do note that some of the pictures are particularly sexually explicit. They’re not for the faint-hearted, and they’re definitely NSFW.

Shock-value aside, it’s worth making an important distinction here between ‘nude selfies’ – which appear to be individuals’ attempts to get other people’s attention – and outright porn, which usually includes links to third-party websites. Our analysis suggests that individuals posting selfies in various states of undress outweigh ‘porn’ by a significant margin.

As a platform, Instgram doesn’t permit images containing nudity, but as you might expect given this volume of uploads, it can take some time before offending pictures are removed.

Tell Me I’m Beautiful…

People often use the #love hashtag together with photographs of make-up and nail-art too. What’s most interesting about these photos is that there are considerably fewer mentions of brands than I’d expect.

There appear to be two key motivations behind beauty-oriented posts. The first is closed related to the theme we saw above, where people are looking for the affirmation of other through their activities – the posts almost seem to ask ‘what do you think of me in this make-up’, without necessarily asking the question directly.

The second motivation is more marketing-related, but it’s generally about selling a make-up or nail artist, rather than the products they sell. This may be determined as much by the sheer volume of posts shared by individuals versus brands, of course, but the findings are nonetheless interesting and valuable to marketers hoping to understand their audiences.

…Tell Me I’ve Got Style

One of the most frequent hashtag correlations we identified was between #love and #ootd (i.e. outfit of the day). Fashion more generally seems to overlap neatly with the #love hashtag, but as with the Beauty theme above it appears that the person posting the photo is more interested in demonstrating their own sense of style than necessarily calling out specific brands.

On a related note, it’s worth highlighting a significant number of posts of people in revealing outfits or underwear. There’s a fine line here that merits some further exploration though, namely the balance between the opportunity for self-expression and the potential for people to make decisions they’ll later regret, or even the risk of exploitation.

(Don’t You) Wish You Were Here?

Even when it comes to product- and brand-related posts, there’s still a tendency to use the #love hashtag to call out things that the ‘poster’ expects other people to love, as much as what they themselves love.

For example, when it comes to travel, there’s a strong tendency towards envy-inducing shots: beaches at sunset, amazing hotel rooms, spectacular landscapes.

The same is true of most photos tagged with #food: there’s a tendency to post impressive meals that the individuals have prepared themselves (the desire for acknowledgment), or that they’re enjoying in special locations or restaurants (a trigger for envy).

Whilst these posts are perhaps less narcissistic than selfies, they still seem to demonstrate that constant need for the recognition and envy of others.

So What?

So what can marketers do with this information?

The answer lies in understanding the motivations that drive this behaviour, not simply in being able to track the behaviour itself.

That many people have a constant need for a self-esteem boost shouldn’t come as a shock to any of us, but it’s interesting how so few brands are fulfilling that need. Indeed, with their own constant attempts to get noticed and attract ‘likes’, most brands in social media are demonstrating the same insecurities themselves.

The big opportunity for brands in all of this is to understand how they can provide what these people need.

Brands could interpret that in two ways, though. One route would be to adopt the Dove approach, addressing the insecurities that drive the behavior in the first place.

The alternative would be to offer the recognition and affirmation the people using the hashtag seem to crave.

Either way, with half a million new #love posts a day, there’s plenty more left for marketers to learn from this incredibly popular hashtag.

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We Are Social Asia Tuesday Tuneup #187

by Aubrey Teng in News

WeChat valued at $83.6 billion
WeChat, China’s messaging app giant, is valued at $83.6 billion. That makes up almost half of parent company TenCent’s value. On top of messaging, it also serves as a platform for ecommerce, mobile payments, social gaming, media and more with a user base of 600 million. With such impressive statistics, it is not hard to see why WeChat and other similar messaging chat apps are attracting many investors.

MSTY, a new music messaging app, launches globally
A new music messaging app MSTY (My Song to You) has recently launched worldwide. It gives users a new way to communicate with friends by combining music with text and photos. Users can pick a song from MSTY’s curated song-clips. They can then attach a photo by taking one in the app, importing a picture from their camera roll or using one of the template images from the app’s library. Users can also type a short message on the image.

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We Are Social Asia Tuesday Tuneup #186

by Melissa Law in News

China’s mobile social networking users to reach 335.9 million
In a recent report cited by ChinaInternetWatch, eMarketer estimates that the number of mobile social networking users in China will reach 335.9 million by the end of 2015. By 2019, they estimate that number will exceed 480.4 million – approximately 35% of the country’s population. Exact numbers for social media users in China can be tricky to come by though; compare this latest report with recent figures from China’s social media giant Tencent, who reported they’d already surpassed more than 500 million active social media accounts accessing via mobile devices in March of this year. The numbers in different reports may vary considerably, but they all have one thing in common: the future of social is most definitely mobile [if you’re looking for more stats on digital use in China, try our recent APAC report].

Find activity buddies with PlanDo
Feeling spontaneous but none of your friends are available? A new social networking app called PlanDo aims to solve that. Developed in Hong Kong, this app helps you find activities to join and potential new buddies just days or even hours in advance. In the future, there are also plans for event organisers and businesses to add listings and take payments within the app.

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We Are Social Asia Tuesday Tuneup #183

by Tan Xing Long in News
What the Fork?: Introducing China’s new social media app

The app is as irreverent as it sounds. It’s been described as “Instagram blended with WeChat and Line stickers”, and it’s just launched in China.

Users of “Fork” get to edit photos with all sorts of outrageous, anarchic stickers to desired comic effect. It’s weird, rebellious, quirky, and of course like any good social media tool, you get to share these photos with your friends. Score.

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India will have 500 million Internet users by 2017: new report

IAMAI-KPMG estimates a total of 500 million Internet users in India by 2017, up from 350 million currently. They’re attributing the jump to cheaper smartphones and more 2G subscriptions boosting Internet usage rates in the country.

Interestingly, even though India has the second highest number of Internet users in the world (after China), online penetration rate is still at 19 per cent.

Twitter removes background wallpaper from users home pages

No official reason was given for this.

Some are suggesting that this was done so Twitter would have more control of their ad display experience. For instance, if a company wanted to do a full homepage advert on Twitter, it would be able to do so now. Twitter backgrounds are currently completely blank, with “a very slight hint of blue”.

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We Are Social Asia Tuesday Tuneup #180

by Kristie Neo in News
Facebook Lite launches in India & the Philippines
The name says it all. Facebook has launched a “Lite” version of its social networking service, targeting users in emerging markets where user growth is expected to expand at a rapid pace. According to reports, India is set to be the largest Facebook user base in the world by 2017, so this is hardly a surprising move from Facebook, really.

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In sum, Facebook Lite is a stripped-down version of the regular app while retaining all the original functions of the service. It is less than 500 KB in size, and works well on 2G, 3G and 4G networks.

Local communication apps, text are preferred modes of mobile communication in Japan, South Korea
That’s according to a report by Ericsson Consumer Lab, which surveyed 100,000 individuals in Japan, South Korea, India, UK and the US. The findings reveal some interesting insights. For instance in India, users spend nearly half of their time on smartphones on communication apps. In markets like Japan and South Korea, local communication apps are more popularly used as compared to those surveyed in the UK and US markets. Japanese and South Koreans also prefer text over voice calls. According to Ericsson, 1 in 4 Japanese smartphone users do not make traditional voice calls anymore.

You can read the full report here.

Taiwanese chat messaging app Pal+ secure $1.3m in funds
Taiwan chat messaging app, Pal+ has received all of $1.3 million in fresh funds to expand its growing venture. The funds came from Asiasoft, a listed game publisher in Thailand.
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Pal+ is a forum-based app which invites individuals with common interests to participate in online discussions. Users get to share and discuss a wide range of topics from entertainment to animation and games, and share them with friends instantly.

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