Here are all of the posts tagged ‘social media’.

We Are Social Asia Tuesday Tuneup #180

by Kristie Neo in News
Facebook Lite launches in India & the Philippines
The name says it all. Facebook has launched a “Lite” version of its social networking service, targeting users in emerging markets where user growth is expected to expand at a rapid pace. According to reports, India is set to be the largest Facebook user base in the world by 2017, so this is hardly a surprising move from Facebook, really.

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In sum, Facebook Lite is a stripped-down version of the regular app while retaining all the original functions of the service. It is less than 500 KB in size, and works well on 2G, 3G and 4G networks.

Local communication apps, text are preferred modes of mobile communication in Japan, South Korea
That’s according to a report by Ericsson Consumer Lab, which surveyed 100,000 individuals in Japan, South Korea, India, UK and the US. The findings reveal some interesting insights. For instance in India, users spend nearly half of their time on smartphones on communication apps. In markets like Japan and South Korea, local communication apps are more popularly used as compared to those surveyed in the UK and US markets. Japanese and South Koreans also prefer text over voice calls. According to Ericsson, 1 in 4 Japanese smartphone users do not make traditional voice calls anymore.

You can read the full report here.

Taiwanese chat messaging app Pal+ secure $1.3m in funds
Taiwan chat messaging app, Pal+ has received all of $1.3 million in fresh funds to expand its growing venture. The funds came from Asiasoft, a listed game publisher in Thailand.
Pal-690
Pal+ is a forum-based app which invites individuals with common interests to participate in online discussions. Users get to share and discuss a wide range of topics from entertainment to animation and games, and share them with friends instantly.

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We Are Cannes Lions Winners

by Robin Grant in News

cannes lions

This week, many of the We Are Social team have been enjoying the sunshine, the parties and of course, the amazing creative work on display at Cannes Lions.

And the week got even better on Tuesday, when we were delighted to hear that our work joined the impressive roster of agencies and brands highlighted as the world’s best at the festival, with four shortlisted entries in the Cyber categories from our London and Parisoffices.

Last night we received even more fantastic news.

Hello Play! for Hello Bank!, BNP Paribas’ mobile bank, picked up two Bronze Lions in Engagement Platform and Financial Services.

It’s a simple idea. It allows Hello Bank!’s customers and non-customers alike to fund music projects, helping support the future of the music they love.

It’s a perfect example of the work that has been gaining traction in Cannes – ideas that make a difference, that make the world just a little bit better. It’s also a great example of social thinking in practice, recognising that those who stream music will be passionate about helping sustain its future.

As our blog post about the campaign explains, to get involved, people can visit the Hello Play! platform and connect to their usual streaming service. Then, by listening to songs, users collect a virtual currency called Hello Coins, which they can redistribute to a choice of music projects. Hello Bank! then transforms the Hello Coins into real money to fund these projects.

It’s already created a lot of brand love for Hello Bank! and has been incredibly successful in terms of results, too, with 35 music projects fully funded so far, and even more to come.

We’re incredibly proud of this work, as well as our Cannes shortlisted campaigns for adidas, #allin or nothing and @brazuca, which have picked up huge global recognition over the last year.

We’re confident that these Lions will be the first of many for We Are Social.

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Video narratives on mobile: Fleeting and looping for attention

by Wui-Liang Lim in News

Last Tuesday, Snapchat announced that media companies like CNN, National Geographic, Vice, MTV, ESPN, and The Daily Mail, will be programming content for them.

This content will appear in a new section of their app called “Discover.”

To watch these “snaps”, like all other Snapchat content, you press a button and it plays – as long you keep your finger there. Remove it and – poof! It disappears.

By having to physically keep a video running, you are forced to look – and focus.

How should brands tell video stories on Snapchat?

Pounce from the start

The opening has to grab the viewer’s attention from the very first frame. No build up is required. And then, keep them glued for the entire ride. Narratives would have to be reworked. For brands, they may need to craft their message to fit into the first few seconds.

One take to rule them all

The Copacabana scene from “Goodfellas“. The opening sequence of “Gravity”. The one-shot scene holds our attention because there are no cuts or edits to let our minds “rest”.

Brands are sharing single-take videos on social media.

The Sunday Times’ Icons of Culture.

Airbnb’s train journey.

This “hold-your-breath” approach is similar to how we view content on Snapchat.

Mobile for mobile

Shoot and edit videos on mobile. Smartphones today record in high-definition. The turnaround is faster. And the raw, gritty feel resonates with younger audiences.

Bye-bye widescreen, hello split screen

Snapchat displays content vertically. Take advantage of this framing to give users details and perspectives they would not normally see on a 16:9 aspect ratio. In “Literally Can’t Even”, a new reality series on Snapchat starring Sasha Spielberg, the daughter of Steven Spielberg, split screens are used.

This method allows the creators to show more content and grab viewers’ attention. They also have to plan carefully to see how each screen can play off each other effectively.

Story first

Content comes before anything else, and is more important now than ever. Ask, “What’s the story?”

On Wednesday, Instagram updated its app to make its videos loop like those on Vine. It is a double-edged sword. Advertisers and content creators think that their videos get more views, but viewers might get turned off. The challenge is tell stories that are interesting when viewed repeatedly. Fashion brand GAP used an elliptical narrative for their first in a series of 12 episodes on Instagram.

They call it “the weirdest love story ever Instagrammed.”

Storytelling will continue to evolve as mobile apps like Snapchat, Vine and Instagram introduce new features. This presents new opportunities and challenges for media companies and brands. They have to understand each platform well and use it as a framework to craft narratives for mobile.

Wui-Liang Lim recently joined the We Are Social Singapore team as Content Director, and is responsible for helping guide the editorial vision and output of the agency and identify new content opportunities for our clients. Follow Wui-Liang on Twitter @LimWuiLiang.

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Social for Time-Strapped Entrepreneurs

by Simon Kemp in News

A couple of weeks ago, I joined forces with the inspiring folks at KPI Singapore for an evening dedicated to Social Media for Entrepreneurs.

You’ll find the presentation I gave on Social Media for Time-Strapped Entrepreneurs in the SlideShare embed above, which provides three simple tips for building social media success in just 10-minutes per day.

The deck explains the tips in detail, but here’s a quick teaser to whet your appetite:

Tip #1: Promoting your business – and yourself as an entrepreneur – on social media isn’t just about posting great content; the real value comes from more subtle activities.

Tip #2: When you do post content, make sure it adds meaningful value for your audience; the presentation outlines ‘5 Habits Of Social People‘ that can help with this.

Tip #3: Large-scale, ‘epic’ content isn’t the only route to long-term social media success; you can often achieve impressive results using simpler approaches.

You’ll find the full story in the deck above, and download the whole thing by clicking here. It’s worth noting that these tips are best used in conjunction with some of our other SlideShare presentations though, especially:

Making Friends & Influencing People: our ‘intro’ guide to social marketing

Listen, Learn, Earn: our introduction to social media listening

B2B Social: how to build a powerful social media presence for your business

Social Brands: how to ensure every aspect of your brand builds social success

Twitter Guide: an essential how-to guide to making the most of Twitter

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Social Networks Are Diversifying

by Jason Mander in News

The wonderful folks at GlobalWebIndex have been great partners to us over the years, most recently helping us to put together our incredibly popular report on digital stats from around the world. In this guest post, GWI’s Jason Mander shares his take on the rapidly evolving world of social media, and what it means for marketers.

Look through We Are Social’s comprehensive new Digital, Social and Mobile in 2015 report, and it’s clear why fast-growth markets are now so important to digital and social trends: regions such as APAC and LatAm contain online populations which are not only vast in size but which are growing at phenomenal year-on-year rates.

What’s more, GlobalWebIndex’s data shows that digital consumers in these fast-growth/emerging markets are some of the most engaged when it comes to online behaviour. We’ve been tracking the daily time that people spend on various forms of media since 2012; by asking our 170,000 annual respondents how long they typically devote to the internet as well as online and offline forms of TV, press and radio, we can build a detailed profile of daily media behaviors. The results show that the internet is capturing more and more of our time each day – with total hours spent online via PCs, laptops, mobiles and tablets growing from 5.55 in 2012 to 6.15 in 2014.

One of the drivers of this is still-increasing levels of engagement with social networks, which have climbed from a daily average of 1.61 to 1.72 hours over the period in question. This offers important food-for-thought given that some commentators still like to proclaim the “end of social networking”. In actual fact, we’re spending more time on networks now than in the earlier part of the decade – with the rise of the mobile internet, and the ability it affords us to connect to a still-widening range of networks at any time and from any location, being a major driver of this.

Time Spent Social Networking by CountryClick image to enlarge: Average number of hours per day spent using social networks, by country. NB: GlobalWebIndex have calculated these average times using data for all internet users (including those who do not use social media at all), whereas the figures in We Are Social’s Digital, Social, & Mobile 2015 report are averages based on the same source data, but which do not include the data for non-social media users.

That said, engagement with social networking can vary significantly from country-to-country. Typically, it is highest in fast-growth/emerging nations where online populations are skewed towards young, urban and affluent demographics (all of these being characteristics which increase an individual’s likelihood of being a social networker).

The Philippines posts the highest figure of all (with a sizeable 3.42 hours), but LatAm countries follow very closely behind. It’s hardly a surprise that there’s a very strong correlation with usage of the mobile internet here; where the mobile web scores well, we typically see social networking accounting for large amounts of daily media time too.

At the other end of the spectrum, we find the lowest amounts of time being devoted to networks in a number of mature markets; here, internet penetration rates are normally very high, meaning the corresponding online populations have a much broader / higher age profile, and are more representative of the country’s total population.

In short, older segments are better represented in mature nations but are some of the least enthusiastic about social networking – something which has an obvious impact on national averages. Japan appears at the very bottom of the table, with just 0.30 hours spent on networking per day; the lack of enthusiasm for networks generally – and for Facebook in particular – are key local factors in this market. Behind this are other mature APAC markets such as Australia as well as most of the European countries tracked by GWI.

Given these geographic and demographic patterns, it’s hardly a surprise that internet users in fast-growth nations are also the biggest “multi-networkers” (those who maintain accounts on the highest number of social platforms). Indonesia tops the table here, with internet users typically being members of 7.39 networks, but it’s in China where people are most likely to actively use the greatest number of social networks (4.27 per internet user). That there are so many local platforms in China is a major contributor to this, as is the fact that leading global names such as Facebook are not as off-limits as is often assumed.

In some studies – especially those based on data from passively collected analytics – it’s still common to see Chinese usage of Facebook, Twitter and similar sites recorded as zero. This is a major mistake; there are in fact a number of ways that Chinese internet users are bypassing official restrictions on social networks, including accessing via apps (16% in China say that they have used the Facebook app in the last 30 days, and a look at the top apps being downloaded in China on a daily basis shows that Western social networks feature very prominently within the list).

Average Number of Social Networks

Click image to enlarge: Average number of active social media accounts maintained by internet users, broken down by age and by country.

Significantly, VPN (Virtual Private Network) apps are also being widely downloaded in China – with these tools representing the other major access route for those Chinese users looking to bypass official restrictions. Close to a fifth of online adults in China in fact say they’ve used a VPN in order to access restricted websites or social platforms.

Not only does this trend underline the potential limitations of using passively collected, geo-located data in isolation – which can over-estimate the size of social audiences in markets such as the USA, Netherlands, South Korea and Sweden, where VPN and Proxy servers tend to be located – it also emphasizes the growing futility of attempting to prevent national audiences from accessing certain sites. Most clearly of all, though, it demonstrates why networking behaviors in China – as well as in many other fast-growth markets – are much more diversified and sophisticated than is often assumed.

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